How YOU Can Work SMARTER Not Harder

We’re sure that you have heard it before. “You should be working smarter, not harder!” It’s a fairly common expression that most people use to help motivate them to be more efficient and stop fumbling around in their work… but it’s more than that.

Read More
Mikayla StoreyComment
How Can SLPs Support Students with Dyslexia?

Literacy intervention, specifically for students with dyslexia causes this interesting conversation around who best supports this type of intervention? Traditionally literacy specialists and special educators have been the ones tasked with supported reading disabilities, I mean…it makes sense it’s an academic issue right?

The challenge is that dyslexia is a language-based learning disability. It’s often really a continuum of an oral language disability that transcended into the world of written language. This is a challenge for literacy specialists and special educators who don’t have a background in supporting oral language problems. And really - literacy specialists and special educators generally don’t have a background in supporting oral language struggles because that is an SLPs bread and butter.

So what this means is that….

Read More
Corey PollardComment
How to Systematically Review Previously Learned Material

This week we’re going to discuss how to systematically review previously learning material. If you’ve been keeping up with our blogs, you’ll know that Structured Literacy is systematic, multi-sensory, and cumulative. Because it is cumulative, this means that concepts build upon each other and are reviewed so that no content is lost.

Read More
Megan LahtiComment
A Look into Teaching -ck

Today, I want to walk through some of the components we want to pull in when teaching -ck to students. We like to use the acronym SMARTER when teaching new phonogram patterns to students. What does SMARTER stand for?

Read More
Megan LahtiComment
Why the Auditory Drill is a Crucial Part of your Lesson

So often, I meet or talk to an interventionist who is leaving out one of the most critical parts of their lesson. Usually, it is because it only takes a few minutes, is similar to other pieces of the lesson, and just gets overlooked. This is doing such a disservice to our students, because without this crucial aspect, their reading intervention is not building a strong enough foundation. This critical piece is the Auditory Drill.

Read More
Mikayla Storey Comments
What is the Purpose of a Sound Drill?

This is a task that we do in every single lesson. If you aren’t familiar with the sound drill, it is when the clinician shows the student a card with a letter on it, and the students have to immediately say what sound/sounds that letter (or letter combination) makes. We always start our lessons with this.

Read More
Mikayla StoreyComment
Learning to Read is Like Playing Jenga

When we think of Reading Intervention, we often refer to the Jenga Tower. This stems from the game Jenga where players take turns strategically pulling  blocks out of a tower. Each block is then placed on top of the tower, creating a progressively taller and more unstable structure.

Read More