Closed Syllables - The Reading and Spelling Rules That Nobody Taught You

Closed Syllables

This month we are excited to talk to you about the Reading and Spelling Rules That Nobody Taught You. More specifically, we're excited to talk about spelling rules within the 6 syllable types that make up the English language. These syllable types are: Closed, Magic E (VCE), Bossy-R, Open, Vowel Teams, and Stable Final (CLE).

Today I want to talk to you about the spelling rules within Closed Syllable words. Just as a quick refresher, a closed syllable is when a vowel is closed in by one or more consonants at the end of the word. When the vowel is closed in, it can only make it's short sound. If you haven't read our blog on Closed Syllables, check it out here!

Within Closed Syllable words, we have 4 different rules to talk about. All of the closed syllable rules take place at the end of a closed syllable word when next to a short vowel - that is very important! Of course, keep in mind that there are always rule breakers or sight words that may not follow these rules.

The first rule is the -ck rule. We use -ck to say /k/ at the end of a short word when the /k/ sound touches a short vowel. Examples of this are duck, kick, stack, lack, brick. In all of these words, the /k/ sound is touching a short vowel, so we will use -ck to spell it. If the /k/ sound is touching a long vowel or a consonant, you'll just use -k. Examples of this are: milk, silk, bask, sink, pink.

Another rule we teach is the FLOSS rule. Using this rule, we double any f,l,s, or z (I call these "Floss letters") when it comes at the end of a short word and touches a short vowel. Examples of this are: tall, bass, fluff, jazz. As long as one of the floss letters is touching a short vowel at the end of our word, we'll want to double them!

The next rules is the -tch rule. We use -tch to say /ch/ at the end of a short word when touching a short vowel. Examples of this are catch, pitch, etch, hatch, stretch. If the/ch/ sound is touching a long vowel or a consonant you'll spell it with a -ch. Examples of this would be: bunch, crunch, ranch, branch, pinch.

-dge is another spelling rule we go over within closed syllables. We use -dge to say /j/ at the end of a short word when the /j/ sound touches a short vowel. We do this because no english word ends with the letter j! So some examples of -dge words are: bridge, fridge, ridge, judge, edge. Again, if the /j/ sound touches a long vowel or a consonant we're going to spell it differently - with a -ge. Examples of this are: sage, age, change, large.

Lastly, our 1-1-1 rule for closed syllable words. When you are adding a vowel suffix to a word with 1 syllabe, 1 short vowel, and it ends in 1 consonant, you must double the final consonant. Examples would be dropping, stopped, slipping, blurred.

Megan LahtiComment